New Year's Resolutions

12-29-2019Eucharistic Adoration

Every New Year’s we make resolutions to quit bad habits and to live healthier lifestyles. At base these resolutions can be good since they reveal a dissatisfaction with mediocrity and a desire to experience abundant life. But why not make a resolution which is not only good for you physically but also spiritually? Consider making Eucharistic Adoration part of your New Year’s resolutions. What we spend our time on reveals what we value. If you desire peace, healing, and fullness of joy then spending time with God will allow you to become fully alive. When we dedicate specific time to prayer we are able to receive the good things God desires to grant us.

God With Us

12-22-2019Eucharistic Adoration

“She will bear a Son, and you shall name Him Jesus for He will save His people from their sins.”—Matthew 1:21

In Advent the Church prepares for the three comings of Christ. She prepares for His coming as a little baby at Christmas. She prepares for His coming at the end of time, when He will come to judge the living and the dead. She also prepares for the coming of Christ in the Eucharist. Emmanuel means “God is with us” (Matthew 1:23). In the Eucharist Jesus is truly ‘God with us’. When Jesus came as a little baby He was vulnerable and weak; He hid his divinity. In the Eucharist Jesus continues to make himself vulnerable and weak, and hides both his divinity and his humanity. God came to save us from our sins 2000 years ago, yet He remains in the Eucharist to heal us from the effects of our sin.

The Three Comings of Christ

12-15-2019Eucharistic Adoration

In Advent the Church prepares for the three comings of Christ. She prepares for His coming as a little baby at Christmas. She prepares for His coming at the end of time, when He will come to judge the living and the dead. She also prepares for the coming of Christ in the Eucharist. Emmanuel means “God is with us” (Matthew 1:23). In the Eucharist Jesus is truly ‘God with us’. When Jesus came as a little baby He was vulnerable and weak; He hid his divinity. In the Eucharist Jesus continues to make himself vulnerable and weak, and hides both his divinity and his humanity. God came to save us from our sins 2000 years ago, yet He remains in the Eucharist to heal us from the effects of our sin.

Counting Your Blessings

12-08-2019Eucharistic Adoration

“I will offer you a sacrifice of thanksgiving and call on the name of the Lord.”—Psalm 116:17

Eucharist means thanksgiving. When we go to Mass we are offering God a sacrifice of praise and thanksgiving for all that He has done for us and all that He continues to do. In a special way Eucharistic Adoration is also a prayer of thanksgiving. When you find it difficult to pray or do not know what to say to God why not count your blessings? Try to think about the ways God has blessed you today, in this week, in this year. Once you begin to recognize the many ways God is already blessing you, your heart will overflow with praise.

Beholding the Glory of God

12-01-2019Eucharistic Adoration

“No eye has seen, nor ear heard, nor has the heart of man conceived, what God has prepared for those who love him.”—1 COR 2:9

Heaven is the place where we shall behold the face of God unveiled. On this Earth we can also behold the face of God yet only the eyes of faith are able to recognize Him. St. Thomas says that on the cross Jesus hid His divinity but in the Eucharist He hides both His divinity and His humanity. It is only through faith that we can look upon the white host and recognize the Lord and giver of life, for “faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things unseen”—Hebrews 11:1. May we look upon our God with faith on this Earth so that we may behold Him in His glory in Heaven.

How To Use An Advent Wreath

12-01-2019Weekly Reflection

Advent wreaths are a Christian tradition with roots in 16th-century Germany. They are seen both in churches and in homes and are an excellent way to prepare for the celebration of Christmas. Here is a step-bystep introduction to the practice and how to implement it in your home.

Create (or buy) an Advent wreath

There is no hard and fast rule regarding what an Advent wreath looks like. A traditional wreath contains a circle of evergreen leaves surrounding a set of four candles. There are usually three purple candles and one rose (pink) candle. However, some traditions have four red candles and others contain an extra white candle. For the purposes of this article we will focus on the three purple and one rose.

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