THE LORD IS RISEN! ALLELUIA! HE IS RISEN INDEED! ALLELUIA! ALLELUIA!!

03-31-2013Weekly ReflectionFr. Jack O’Kane

Happy Easter! Today we celebrate the Resurrection of the Lord with the entire Catholic Church around the world. The salvation of the world promised to us by God from the first fall of man by Adam is achieved by Jesus Christ when He conquered the power of death and rose to new life. At a time when all seemed lost, when evil appeared to triumph, when Innocence hung on cross and was placed in a tomb, God's glory emerged to show that He is Lord of all.

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The Church is Alive!

03-24-2013Weekly ReflectionFr. Tim Christy

Dear Parish Family,

When Pope Benedict left the Chair of Peter, in one of his last public addresses he said firmly and joyfully "the Church is alive!" As I have been caught up these last days watching and taking part in my own way, I see its' absolutely true; the Church is alive!

The crowds of people waiting for sometimes hours in St. Peters' Square, while waving national flags, singing songs and cheering and praying in the rain all testified to the truth that indeed we have a Church alive.

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How do you handle distractions during Holy Mass?

03-17-2013Weekly ReflectionFr. Joseph Kabali

While visiting a group of Catholics, our informal conversation turned into a profound discussion about distractions during Mass. We focused first on two questions: Do you feel distracted during mass? If so, what are your distractions?" The responses included the following summary:

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Prodigal Son

03-10-2013Weekly ReflectionDeacon Mike Bachynsky

Dear Parish Family,

In 2011, I was blessed to be able to visit St. Petersburg, Russia. The Hermitage art museum is located there. The museum has over 3,000,000 items and the largest collection of paintings in the world. It was founded by Catherine the Great in 1764. One of the six museum buildings was the Winter Palace where Russian emperors lived. It also happens to house the original painting: The Return of the Prodigal Son, by Rembrandt. The painting is over 8-1/2 ft tall and 6-3/4 ft wide. As I turned a corner, I saw this amazing painting. This small copy does not do it justice. But I mention it because it is the parable we hear today in Luke's Gospel. And the painting itself tells the story that we hear in the Gospel. How can the painting tell the story? Well, there are a few interesting details in the painting that help us understand the story. First, the son is kneeling before his father. He is in a total state of submission and is asking his father's forgiveness (perhaps this reminds you of confession). Secondly, a closer look at the son reveals that his clothes are all torn and tattered. He is missing one of his sandals. He is a wreck. But the father is well dressed; he is slightly stooped over, and he has his hands on his son's shoulder. It is the ultimate expression of mercy. And his hands are very different. The left hand is larger with stronger features- making it look more masculine. The right hand is smaller and smoother, suggesting a female hand. The implication is that there is both a strong guiding hand of a father and a soft nurturing hand of a mother. The older son is standing off to the side with his hands folded – judging this unconditional act of mercy by his father.

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